History of cannabis and its Derivatives (Explained)

Cannabis has been cultivated for over 4000 years. The first scientific mention of cannabis dates back to 1542 when the German botanist Leonhart Fuchs put a new object called Cannabis sativa (cultivated cannabis).

The spread of the plant has always been enormous – for centuries it has been cultivated in Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Europe. In the twentieth century, all that has changed.

In 1912, an international opium convention was signed allowing marijuana to be produced and used only for medicinal purposes.

In 1937, a cannabis tax law was introduced in the United States. Failure to pay the tax could result in a large fine or prison sentence for anyone caught red-handed.

In 1940, Robert S. Kahn discovered the structure of cannabinol. Just two years later, in 1942, Roger Adams discovered tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

In 1961, the United Nations adopted the Single Convention, which equated cannabis with heroin, methadone, and opium.

In 1963 Raphael Meshulam isolated cannabidiol (CBD), in 1964 he achieved the same with THC.

In the 1970s, the US authorities declared marijuana a Schedule I drug under the Controlled Substances Act, which meant that any medical research related to it was banned.

In 2017, the US National Academy of Medicine issued a report on the limitations of scientific evidence on the effects of cannabis on human health. This led to a formal resumption of research programs. In the same year, WHO declared CBD a non-addictive component with a good safety profile and therapeutic benefits.

In December 2020, the UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs removed medical cannabis and all its derivatives from the list of critical drugs.

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Cannabis has been cultivated for over 4000 years. The first scientific mention of cannabis dates back to 1542 when the German botanist Leonhart Fuchs put a new object called Cannabis sativa (cultivated cannabis).

The spread of the plant has always been enormous – for centuries it has been cultivated in Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Europe. In the twentieth century, all that has changed.

In 1912, an international opium convention was signed allowing marijuana to be produced and used only for medicinal purposes.

In 1937, a cannabis tax law was introduced in the United States. Failure to pay the tax could result in a large fine or prison sentence for anyone caught red-handed.

In 1940, Robert S. Kahn discovered the structure of cannabinol. Just two years later, in 1942, Roger Adams discovered tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

In 1961, the United Nations adopted the Single Convention, which equated cannabis with heroin, methadone, and opium.

In 1963 Raphael Meshulam isolated cannabidiol (CBD), in 1964 he achieved the same with THC.

In the 1970s, the US authorities declared marijuana a Schedule I drug under the Controlled Substances Act, which meant that any medical research related to it was banned.

In 2017, the US National Academy of Medicine issued a report on the limitations of scientific evidence on the effects of cannabis on human health. This led to a formal resumption of research programs. In the same year, WHO declared CBD a non-addictive component with a good safety profile and therapeutic benefits.

In December 2020, the UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs removed medical cannabis and all its derivatives from the list of critical drugs.

James Alexander James Alexander
Hey, I'm James! The founder and head writer here at GreenBudGuru.com. I started this site to share my passion and knowledge of all things cannabis. I used to work as a budtender in central Amsterdam, and have over 7 years of growing experience.

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